Oral surgery

25.A facial surgeon by any other name

Would changing ‘oral and maxillofacial surgeon’ (OMS) to ‘oral and facial surgeon’ improve the perception and awareness of the OMS’s role and surgical scope of practice in undergraduate biomedical and dental students? A cross-sectional study requested undergraduate and dental students to select 1 of 5 specialists to treat 21 conditions. Two different surveys were presented: one designating specialists as ‘oral and maxillofacial surgeons’, the other as ‘oral and facial surgeons.’ The sample was composed of 1,671 undergraduate upper division science students and 568 senior dental students. Results showed that undergraduate students’ perception of an OMS’s surgical scope increased significantly from 28% to 33% when ‘oral and facial surgeon’ was used instead of ‘oral and maxillofacial surgeon.’ Dental students’ perception of an OMS’s surgical scope remained the same with either title. The results suggest that using ‘oral and facial surgeon’ could be an important step toward increasing the recognition of the profession by the general public and other non-dental medical colleagues.

Guerrero AV et al. what name best represents our specialty? oral and maxillofacial surgeon versus oral and facial surgeon. J Oral Maxillofacial Surg 2017 75: 9-20.

Q Changing the designation ‘oral and maxillofacial surgeon’ (OMS) to ‘oral and facial surgeon’:
A Did not change undergraduate students’ perception of an OMS’s surgical scope
B Would not increase the recognition of the profession by non-dental medical colleagues
C Increased dental students’ perception of an OMS’s surgical scope
D May increase the recognition of the profession by the general public

26.A matter of closure

The objective of this study was to compare the bacterial colonisation on different suture materials after third molar extractions. Thirty patients were randomly selected from those undergoing third molar extraction and were divided into three groups using different suture materials: Ethicon Silk 4/0, B. Braun Dafilon 4/0, and B. Braun Safil 4/0. All patients followed the same postsurgical protocols and after 7 days distal sutures were removed by a single operator, placed in physiologic solution and analysed. The cocci and bacilli on the sutures analysed showed that silk (Ethicon Silk) had the higher level of retention material while monofilament (B. Braun Dafilon) had the lowest. There was a difference between monofilament and polyglycolide (B. Braun Safil), as the former is less retentive than the latter, although not significantly so. Lower plaque retention, and consequently lower bacterial presence, is crucial to minimise the inflammatory process and allow better tissue healing. 
The use of monofilament or polyglycolide threads in sutures can help reduce bacterial concentration and therefore promote faster and better healing.

Bucci M et al. Microbiological analysis of bacterial plaque on three different threads in oral surgery. Minerva Stomatologica 2017 66: 28-34.

Q Ethicon Silk 4/0 as a suture material:
A Showed the lowest retention of bacterial counts
B Had a lower retention of bacteria than monofilament (B. Braun Dafilon) 
C Showed the highest retention of bacterial counts
D Is the only suture to be used in surgical removal of third molars